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13 Great Books Like Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow: Ultimate List

Heartwrenching and a powerful book, Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow, impacted me in one way or another. The deepness and the struggles of our antagonist is so relatable at so many levels.

If you loved reading Girl in Pieces and are looking for more thought-provoking and emotionally powerful books, this is for you.  

Books like Girl in Pieces
Girls in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow

I’ve curated a list of books that are similar in theme, style, and impact. From the powerful exploration of trauma in Speak to the inspiring search for identity in The Perks of Being a Wallflower, these books will keep you captivated from beginning to end.

Each book on this list delves deep into complex emotions, tackles important issues, and offers a raw and honest portrayal of the human experience. Whether you’re looking for tales of resilience, self-discovery, or personal growth, these recommendations will leave a lasting impression and keep you turning the pages long into the night.

Best Books Like Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow

A quick run through of the best books like Girl In Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow:

  • Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  • Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson
  • All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
  • It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini
  • Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
  • Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • Cut by Patricia McCormick
  • Go Ask Alice by Beatrice Sparks
  • Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman
  • Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone
  • The Bell Jar by Slyvia Plath

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson is a powerful and important novel that tackles the sensitive topic of sexual assault and its aftermath. The story follows Melinda, a high school freshman who becomes an outcast after calling the police at a summer party. As the novel unravels, readers witness Melinda’s journey towards finding her voice and healing from her traumatic experience.

Speak addresses themes of trauma, isolation, and the power of speaking up. The novel explores the emotional and psychological impact of sexual assault on the survivor, as well as the challenges of navigating high school and finding a sense of belonging.

Laurie Halse Anderson’s writing is raw and honest, capturing the complexity of Melinda’s emotions and experiences. Speak is a must-read for those looking for 

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas is a powerful and thought-provoking novel that tackles important social issues such as police brutality, racism, and identity. The story follows Starr Carter, a sixteen-year-old girl who witnesses the shooting of her unarmed friend Khalil by a police officer. As Starr navigates the aftermath of the tragedy, she finds herself torn between her two worlds – the poor, predominantly black neighborhood where she lives and the wealthy, mostly white prep school she attends.

Through Starr’s perspective, Thomas explores the complexities of race, prejudice, and injustice in contemporary America. The novel raises questions about systemic racism, accountability, and the power of speaking up against injustice. It also highlights the importance of finding one’s voice and using it to enact change.

The Hate U Give has received widespread acclaim for its authentic portrayal of real-life issues and its compelling characters. It has been praised for its powerful storytelling, emotional depth, and its ability to spark dialogue and empathy. The novel was adapted into a successful film in 2018, further cementing its impact and relevance.

If you enjoyed Girl in Pieces and are looking for similar reads that explore important social themes and feature strong, relatable characters, The Hate U Give is an excellent choice. It is a timely and poignant novel that will challenge and inspire readers of all ages.

Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson

Wintergirls is a powerful and haunting novel by Laurie Halse Anderson that explores themes of self-destruction, mental illness, and the journey towards recovery. The story follows Lia, a young girl struggling with an eating disorder and the death of her best friend, whose ghostly presence continues to haunt her.

The novel delves deep into the complexities of mental health, providing a raw and honest portrayal of the struggles faced by individuals dealing with eating disorders. Anderson’s writing is emotionally charged, immersing readers in Lia’s thoughts and inner turmoil as she battles with her own body and mind.

Wintergirls not only sheds light on the devastating effects of eating disorders but also examines the impact of societal pressures, family dynamics, and the importance of self-acceptance and self-love. It raises awareness about the need for empathy and understanding when it comes to mental health issues.

Readers who enjoyed Girl in Pieces for its exploration of mental health and its realistic portrayal of a young girl’s journey towards healing and self-discovery will find Wintergirls to be a compelling and thought-provoking read. This novel tackles important themes with sensitivity and offers hope for those who may be struggling with similar issues.

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven is a heart-wrenching novel that explores themes of mental health, grief, and the power of human connection. The story follows Violet Markey and Theodore Finch, two teenagers who meet on the ledge of their school’s bell tower. They embark on a journey of self-discovery and healing as they navigate their own personal struggles.

Niven’s writing captures the raw emotions and complex inner worlds of Violet and Finch, shedding light on the often stigmatized topics of depression and suicide. Through their unique perspectives, readers gain a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by those living with mental illness.

All the Bright Places is a beautifully written and impactful novel that addresses important issues with sensitivity and honesty. It serves as a reminder of the importance of empathy, understanding, and reaching out to those who may be struggling.

It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini

It’s Kind of a Funny Story is a novel by Ned Vizzini that explores the topics of mental health, depression, and finding hope in unexpected places. The story follows Craig Gilner, a 15-year-old boy who checks himself into a psychiatric hospital after feeling overwhelmed by the pressures of school and life.

Inside the hospital, Craig meets a diverse group of individuals who are also struggling with their own mental health issues. Through their shared experiences, Craig learns valuable lessons about empathy, self-discovery, and the importance of human connection.

Vizzini’s novel explores the serious topic of mental illness with a touch of humor and optimism. It offers a realistic portrayal of the challenges faced by young people dealing with mental health issues while also emphasizing the importance of seeking help and finding support.

If you enjoyed Girl in Pieces and are looking for similar reads that explore themes of mental health and resilience, It’s Kind of a Funny Story is a highly recommended choice. It provides a thought-provoking and compassionate perspective on mental illness in a relatable and engaging narrative.

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher is a powerful and thought-provoking novel that tackles important themes such as mental health, bullying, and suicide. The book follows the story of Hannah Baker, a teenager who takes her own life and leaves behind a series of cassette tapes explaining the thirteen reasons why she made that decision.

Asher’s writing style is raw and emotional, delving into the complexities of Hannah’s life and the impact of her choices on those around her. Through the tapes, readers are taken on a journey as the main character, Clay Jensen, listens to each tape and unravels the events and people that led to Hannah’s ultimate decision.

Thirteen Reasons Why raises important questions about the consequences of our actions and the power of small moments that can have a lasting impact on someone’s life. It explores the effects of bullying, gossip, and social dynamics within a high school setting, shedding light on the sometimes harsh realities many teenagers face.

This novel serves as a reminder of the importance of empathy and compassion, urging readers to be mindful of their words and actions. It sparks conversations about mental health and suicide, highlighting the need for open dialogue and support systems for those struggling.

As with Girl in Pieces, Thirteen Reasons Why deals with heavy and sensitive topics. It may be triggering for some readers, so it is important to approach it with caution and take care of your mental well-being while reading.

Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen

Girl, Interrupted is a memoir by Susanna Kaysen that provides a raw and honest account of her experiences living in a psychiatric hospital in the 1960s. The book explores themes of mental illness, identity, and the complexities of institutionalization.

In the memoir, Kaysen reflects on the two years she spent at McLean Hospital, a renowned psychiatric facility. She describes the challenging and often surreal experiences she had while living among other young women with various mental health issues.

Kaysen’s narrative delves into her own struggles with self-destructive behavior and her efforts to navigate the blurred lines between sanity and madness. She explores the stigmatization of mental illness during that time period and raises important questions about the nature of sanity and the impact of societal norms.

Girl, Interrupted offers a poignant and thought-provoking perspective on mental health and the difficulties faced by those living with mental illness. It sheds light on the often misunderstood world of psychiatric institutions and challenges readers to reevaluate their own preconceptions and judgments surrounding mental health.

Whether you’re interested in exploring the complexities of mental illness or simply looking for a compelling and introspective memoir, Girl, Interrupted is a must-read that will leave a lasting impact.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky is a coming-of-age novel that explores themes of identity, friendship, and self-discovery. The book follows the story of Charlie, a socially awkward teenager navigating the challenges of high school.

Through a series of letters addressed to an anonymous recipient, Charlie shares his experiences, thoughts, and emotions. He forms friendships with a group of misfit seniors, Sam and Patrick, who introduce him to new experiences and help him come out of his shell.

The novel delves into the complexities of teenage life, including issues such as mental health, sexuality, and trauma. It tackles these topics with sensitivity and authenticity, offering a relatable and poignant portrayal of adolescence.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a heartfelt and honest exploration of the ups and downs of growing up. It resonates with readers who have felt like outsiders or struggled to find their place in the world. The book offers a reminder that everyone has their own struggles and that genuine connections and self-acceptance can make a world of difference.

Cut by Patricia McCormick

Cut by Patricia McCormick is a powerful and emotional young adult novel that tackles the sensitive topic of self-harm. The book follows the story of Callie, a teenage girl who is admitted to a psychiatric facility after years of self-inflicted harm. Through her journey, Callie learns to confront her past and find hope and healing.

Cut offers a raw and honest portrayal of mental health issues, exploring the pain and struggles that individuals may face. McCormick’s writing delves deep into the psyche of the main character, providing readers with a glimpse into the mindset of someone struggling with self-harm.

The novel also sheds light on the importance of seeking help and finding support. Callie’s interactions with her fellow patients and the therapists at the facility highlight the role of therapy and understanding in the recovery process.

Go Ask Alice by Beatrice Sparks

Go Ask Alice by Beatrice Sparks is a powerful and controversial book that delves into the world of drug addiction and teenage struggles. The book is written in the form of a diary, where an anonymous teenage girl chronicles her downward spiral into addiction and the challenges she faces along the way.

The raw and honest portrayal of the protagonist’s experiences makes Go Ask Alice a compelling and thought-provoking read. It offers readers an inside look into the realities of drug abuse, peer pressure, and the consequences of one’s actions.

The book explores themes of identity, self-destruction, and the search for acceptance. It challenges societal norms and highlights the importance of making informed choices and seeking help when needed.

Go Ask Alice is a book that resonates with readers of all ages, as it addresses universal issues that many individuals face during their teenage years. It serves as a reminder of the power of literature to shed light on important topics and encourage open dialogue about difficult subjects.

Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman

Challenger Deep is a thought-provoking and emotive novel that explores themes of mental health and identity. The book follows the journey of a teenager named Caden Bosch, who struggles with mental illness and begins to lose touch with reality. As his mind spirals into the depths of his own imagination, he finds himself aboard a ship headed for the deepest part of the ocean called Challenger Deep.

Neal Shusterman’s compelling narrative delves into the complexities of mental illness, capturing the confusion and isolation experienced by individuals who are grappling with their own minds. Through striking prose and vivid imagery, Challenger Deep offers readers a glimpse into the lived experience of mental illness and the power of empathy and understanding.

The novel has received critical acclaim for its honest portrayal of mental health and its exploration of themes such as family, friendship, and self-acceptance. It has won several awards, including the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature in 2015.

If you enjoyed Girl in Pieces and are looking for another impactful read that explores similar themes, Challenger Deep is a highly recommended choice.

Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

Every Last Word is a powerful young adult novel written by Tamara Ireland Stone. It tells the story of Samantha McAllister, a high school girl who appears to have it all, but secretly struggles with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). She tries to keep her disorder hidden from her friends, fearing their judgment and rejection.

When Samantha discovers a secret poetry club at school, she finds solace and a sense of belonging among a group of like-minded individuals. Through her involvement in the club, Samantha begins to challenge her own perceptions of herself and others, and learns to navigate the complexities of friendship, love, and mental health.

Every Last Word tackles important themes such as mental illness, self-acceptance, and the power of supportive friendships. It offers a realistic portrayal of OCD and its impact on daily life, while also emphasizing the importance of seeking help and finding healthy outlets for expression.

Tamara Ireland Stone’s writing is heartfelt and engaging, drawing readers into Samantha’s world and allowing them to empathize with her struggles. The story is both emotional and uplifting, reminding readers that they are not alone in their own battles.

Overall, Every Last Word is a must-read for fans of Girl in Pieces and anyone looking for a compelling and poignant exploration of mental health and self-discovery.

The Bell Jar by Slyvia Plath

The Bell Jar is a semi-autobiographical novel written by Sylvia Plath. The novel follows the story of Esther Greenwood, a talented young woman who finds herself spiraling into depression and grappling with identity and societal expectations.

The novel provides a poignant and honest portrayal of mental illness, exploring themes of alienation, societal pressures, and the search for self. Plath’s writing is deeply introspective and captures the complex emotions and experiences of the protagonist.

“The Bell Jar” has been praised for its raw and powerful depiction of mental health issues, making it a recommended read for those interested in exploring similar themes to “Girl in Pieces.” It offers a compelling and thought-provoking narrative that sheds light on the challenges individuals face in their journey towards self-discovery and acceptance.

books Like Girl in Pieces – Final Thoughts

If you enjoyed Girl in Pieces and are looking for similar reads that explore themes of trauma, resilience, and self-discovery, there are several books that you might find compelling. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson, The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, and Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson are all powerful novels that tackle difficult subjects with raw honesty. 

These books delve into the experiences of young women facing adversity and the transformative journeys they embark upon.

Other books like All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven, It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini, and Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher also explore themes of mental health and adolescent struggles. These books offer thought-provoking narratives that shed light on the challenges faced by young people navigating their way through difficult circumstances.

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