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12 Great Books Like The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog

When you are through the book pages of the book The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog by Bruce D. Perry and Maia Szalavitz, the first line of sentence is the question:

How does trauma affect a child’s mind—and how can that mind recover?

The experienced child psychiatrist Dr. Bruce D. Perry has helped children experiencing unimaginable horror.

This book tells their stories of trauma and how they were able to recover. A sharing of insightful science about what happens to the brain of the children when exposed to extreme stress. This book is also a revelation of unexpected measures on how to help them process their trauma and become healthier adults.

If you’re looking for something like that, this book list is for you.

The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog

Best Books Like The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog 

Here’s quick run through of the books like The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog.

  • The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity by Nadine Burke Harris
  • Born for Love: Why Empathy Is Essential–and Endangered by Bruce D. Perry and Maia Szalavitz
  • The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma by Bessel van der Kolk
  • In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter A. Levine
  • Wounded Minds: Understanding and Solving the Growing Menace of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder by John Liebert
  • The Attachment Effect: Exploring the Powerful Ways Our Earliest Bond Shapes Our Relationships and Lives by Peter Lovenheim
  • The Neurobiology of Attachment-Focused Therapy: Enhancing Connection & Trust in the Treatment of Children & Adolescents by Daniel A. Hughes and Jonathan Baylin
  • The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease: The Hidden Epidemic by Ruth A. Lanius, Eric Vermetten, and Clare Pain
  • Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence–from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror by Judith Lewis Herman
  • Healing Developmental Trauma: How Early Trauma Affects Self-Regulation, Self-Image, and the Capacity for Relationship by Laurence Heller and Aline LaPierre
  • Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them by Ross W. Greene
  • The Yes Brain: How to Cultivate Courage, Curiosity, and Resilience in Your Child by Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson

The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity By Nadine Burke Harris

The Deepest Well by Nadine Burke Harris M. D.

The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity by Nadine Burke Harris is a book that delves into the profound impact of childhood adversity and trauma on long-term health and well-being. 

Dr. Burke Harris, a pediatrician, discusses the science behind adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and how they can lead to physical and mental health issues later in life. She also explores strategies and interventions to mitigate the effects of childhood trauma and offers insights into how individuals, communities, and healthcare professionals can work together to support healing and resilience in those who have experienced adversity. 

The book highlights the importance of early intervention and compassionate care in addressing the far-reaching consequences of childhood trauma.

Born for Love: Why Empathy Is Essential–and Endangered by Bruce D. Perry and Maia Szalavitz

Born for Love: Why Empathy Is Essential–and Endangered by Bruce D. Perry and Maia Szalavitz is a thought-provoking book that examines the significance of empathy in human development and society. 

The authors explore how empathy is an innate quality in humans and an essential component of healthy emotional and social development. They argue that empathy is crucial for building meaningful relationships, fostering compassion, and creating a more humane and connected world.

However, the book also discusses how various factors, including early childhood experiences, societal influences, and technology, can threaten the development of empathy in individuals and society as a whole. 

Perry and Szalavitz present insights from neuroscience and psychology to shed light on the importance of nurturing empathy from a young age and how it can be preserved and cultivated throughout life.

The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma by Bessel van der Kolk

The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma by Bessel van der Kolk is a groundbreaking book that explores the profound effects of trauma on the human body, mind, and emotions. 

Dr. van der Kolk, a renowned psychiatrist and trauma expert, draws upon decades of research and clinical experience to provide a comprehensive understanding of how trauma can shape an individual’s life.

The book dives into the neurobiological and psychological aspects of trauma, explaining how it can become stored in the body, affecting not only mental health but physical health as well. 

Dr. van der Kolk explores various therapeutic approaches, including innovative treatments like EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) and neurofeedback, that have shown promise in helping individuals recover from trauma.

Furthermore, “The Body Keeps the Score” emphasizes the importance of recognizing trauma’s far-reaching impact on individuals and society, from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans to the effects of childhood abuse. It advocates for more holistic approaches to trauma treatment that address both the mind and body.


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In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter A. Levine

In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter A. Levine is a book that explores the relationship between trauma and the body’s innate capacity to heal itself. 

Dr. Peter Levine, a renowned expert in the field of trauma therapy, introduces the concept of “somatic experiencing,” a therapeutic approach that focuses on the physical sensations and bodily responses associated with trauma.

The book explains how traumatic experiences can become trapped in the body, leading to a wide range of physical and psychological symptoms. Dr. Levine describes how, through somatic experiencing techniques, individuals can learn to access and release the stored tension and energy associated with trauma. By doing so, they can restore a sense of goodness and well-being.

Dr. Levine draws from his extensive research and clinical practice to illustrate how trauma can be processed and resolved through the body’s wisdom, rather than solely through talking therapies. He emphasizes the importance of reconnecting with the body’s natural rhythms and responses as a path to healing.

Wounded Minds: Understanding and Solving the Growing Menace of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder by John Liebert

Wounded Minds: Understanding and Solving the Growing Menace of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder by John Liebert is a book that addresses the pressing issue of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its impact on individuals and society. Dr. John Liebert, a psychiatrist and expert in the field of trauma, delves into the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD.

In the book, Dr. Liebert discusses the various causes and manifestations of PTSD, particularly focusing on the experiences of trauma survivors, including combat veterans, survivors of natural disasters, and victims of violence. He provides insights into the neurobiological and psychological mechanisms that underlie PTSD, emphasizing the importance of early intervention and effective treatment.

Wounded Minds also explores the social and cultural factors that contribute to the growing prevalence of PTSD and the challenges faced by individuals affected by this condition. Dr. Liebert highlights the need for improved awareness, support, and resources for those struggling with PTSD and offers strategies for addressing this mental health crisis.

The Attachment Effect: Exploring the Powerful Ways Our Earliest Bond Shapes Our Relationships and Lives by Peter Lovenheim

The Attachment Effect: Exploring the Powerful Ways Our Earliest Bond Shapes Our Relationships and Lives by Peter Lovenheim is a book that delves into the profound impact of early attachment experiences on an individual’s relationships and overall life. 

Peter Lovenheim, an author and journalist, explores the concept of attachment theory, which was originally developed by John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth.

In the book, Lovenheim defines how our early relationships with caregivers, often forming the foundation of our attachment styles, influence our behaviors, emotions, and connections with others throughout our lives. 

Lovenheim also discusses how individuals can become more aware of their attachment styles and work towards developing healthier, more secure connections with others. He explores the idea that understanding and addressing attachment issues can lead to more fulfilling and satisfying relationships.

The Neurobiology of Attachment-Focused Therapy: Enhancing Connection & Trust in the Treatment of Children & Adolescents by Daniel A. Hughes and Jonathan Baylin

The Neurobiology of Attachment-Focused Therapy: Enhancing Connection & Trust in the Treatment of Children & Adolescents by Daniel A. Hughes and Jonathan Baylin is a book that explores the intersection of attachment theory and neurobiology in the context of therapy for children and adolescents. 

This book focuses on the application of attachment theory to therapeutic practices and how understanding the neurobiology of attachment can enhance treatment outcomes.

Daniel A. Hughes, a clinical psychologist, and Jonathan Baylin, a neurobiologist, collaborate to provide a comprehensive understanding of how early attachment experiences influence brain development and emotional regulation. They discuss the ways in which insecure attachment patterns can lead to emotional and behavioral challenges in children and adolescents.

The book offers practical insights and strategies for therapists and mental health professionals working with young clients who have experienced attachment disruptions or trauma. It emphasizes the importance of creating a secure therapeutic relationship and explores how attachment-focused therapy can help foster connection and trust in the treatment process.

The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease: The Hidden Epidemic by Ruth A. Lanius, Eric Vermetten, and Clare Pain

The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease: The Hidden Epidemic by Ruth A. Lanius, Eric Vermetten, and Clare Pain is a book that explores the profound and often overlooked consequences of early life trauma on an individual’s physical and mental health throughout their lifespan. The authors, who are experts in the fields of psychiatry, psychology, and neuroscience, delve into the long-term effects of childhood trauma on various aspects of well-being.

In this book, the authors draw upon scientific research and clinical expertise to examine the links between early life trauma and the development of physical and mental health conditions, including but not limited to anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, autoimmune diseases, and chronic pain.

The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease also discusses the importance of recognizing and addressing childhood trauma in healthcare settings, as well as strategies for prevention and intervention. It sheds light on the hidden epidemic of trauma’s impact on public health and highlights the need for a more comprehensive and trauma-informed approach to healthcare.

This book serves as a valuable resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and anyone interested in understanding the lifelong consequences of early trauma and the importance of trauma-informed care in promoting overall health and well-being.

Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence–from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror by Judith Lewis Herman

Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence–from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror by Judith Lewis Herman is a seminal work in the field of psychology that explores the psychological and emotional impact of trauma on survivors. Dr. Herman, a psychiatrist and trauma expert, examines various forms of trauma, from interpersonal violence such as domestic abuse and sexual assault to larger societal traumas like political violence and war.

The book outlines a comprehensive framework for understanding the psychological and emotional responses of individuals who have experienced trauma. Dr. Herman introduces the concept of complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) and discusses how trauma can affect an individual’s sense of self, relationships, and overall mental health.

Trauma and Recovery also highlights the importance of recognizing and validating the experiences of trauma survivors, as well as the role of therapy and support in the healing process. Dr. Herman advocates for a survivor-centered approach to treatment and discusses the challenges and possibilities of recovery.

This book is widely regarded as a foundational text in the study of trauma and has been influential in shaping the field of trauma psychology and therapy. It offers valuable insights for mental health professionals, educators, policymakers, and anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the impact of trauma and the pathways to recovery.

Healing Developmental Trauma: How Early Trauma Affects Self-Regulation, Self-Image, and the Capacity for Relationship by Laurence Heller and Aline LaPierre

Healing Developmental Trauma: How Early Trauma Affects Self-Regulation, Self-Image, and the Capacity for Relationship by Laurence Heller and Aline LaPierre is a book that explores the impact of early developmental trauma on an individual’s emotional regulation, self-concept, and ability to form healthy relationships. The authors, both experienced therapists, delve into the effects of trauma that occur during critical stages of development.

The book introduces the concept of Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD), which encompasses a range of symptoms and challenges resulting from early trauma experiences. Heller and LaPierre provide insights into how these early traumas can shape an individual’s nervous system, affecting their capacity for self-regulation and their sense of self.

Through case studies and therapeutic techniques, the authors offer a comprehensive approach to healing developmental trauma. They emphasize the importance of somatic experiencing and relational therapies in addressing the complex effects of early trauma and fostering resilience.

Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them by Ross W. Greene

Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them by Ross W. Greene is a book that addresses the challenges faced by children with behavioral difficulties in the school system and offers strategies for helping them succeed. Dr. Ross W. Greene, a clinical psychologist, and educator focuses on a collaborative and empathetic approach to understanding and supporting these children.

In the book, Dr. Greene argues that challenging behaviors in children are often a result of unmet needs and unsolved problems, rather than deliberate misconduct. He introduces the concept of “Collaborative Problem Solving” (CPS), which involves working together with the child to identify and address the underlying issues contributing to their behavior. This approach shifts away from punitive measures and emphasizes proactive problem-solving and skill-building.

Lost at School explores real-life case examples and provides practical guidance for parents, educators, and professionals in understanding and implementing the CPS model. Dr. Greene highlights the importance of empathy, communication, and collaboration in creating a more supportive and effective learning environment for children with behavioral challenges.

The Yes Brain: How to Cultivate Courage, Curiosity, and Resilience in Your Child by Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson

The Yes Brain: How to Cultivate Courage, Curiosity, and Resilience in Your Child by Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson is a book that offers insights and practical guidance for parents and caregivers on nurturing a positive and resilient mindset in children. Dr. Daniel J. Siegel, a psychiatrist, and Tina Payne Bryson, a psychotherapist, draw from the fields of neuroscience and psychology to provide strategies for fostering courage, curiosity, and resilience in children.

The central concept of the book is the Yes Brain, which represents a state of openness, receptivity, and emotional regulation in children. The authors argue that developing a Yes Brain in children can lead to greater adaptability, emotional intelligence, and problem-solving skills.

Throughout the book, Siegel and Bryson share stories, case studies, and practical exercises to help parents understand the importance of fostering a Yes Brain in their children. They discuss the impact of mindfulness, empathy, and positive communication on a child’s development and well-being. 

Books Like The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog – Final Thoughts

2 Comments

  1. I had to read this book for my masters program. It was very insightful. I too have loved reading since a child, I think it helped keep me on the write track.

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