| |

13 Dystopic Books Like The Giver: My Best Recommendations

If you’re a fan of The Giver by Lois Lowry and looking for more thought-provoking dystopian novels, you’ve come to the right place. The Giver by Lois Lowry has been adapted into a movie.

These 13 books like The Giver offer similar themes of societal control, individuality, and the quest for truth, making them perfect recommendations if you’re a fan

Best Books Like The Giver by Lois Lowry

From Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” to Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale,” each book on this list transports readers to a different dystopian world, immersing them in stories that challenge the status quo and explore the consequences of conformity. So if you’re ready to dive into a new dystopian adventure, grab one of these books and get ready to be captivated.

Books like The Giver by Lois Lowry
The Giver by Lois Lowry

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World is a dystopian novel written by Aldous Huxley and published in 1932. It is set in a future society that is controlled by technology, where individuals are genetically engineered and conditioned to serve specific roles in the social hierarchy.

The novel explores themes of individuality, freedom, and the dangers of a society that prioritizes stability and conformity over personal autonomy. It raises questions about the nature of happiness, the use of technology to control and manipulate individuals, and the ethical implications of a society that values efficiency and pleasure above all else.

Like The Giver, Brave New World offers a thought-provoking examination of a seemingly utopian society that is not as idyllic as it initially appears. It challenges readers to question the trade-offs between personal freedom and social stability, and the importance of individuality and emotional depth in a world that prioritizes efficiency and uniformity.

If you enjoyed The Giver and are looking for a similar read that explores themes of dystopia and societal control, Brave New World is a must-read.


RELATED POSTS

9 Best Dystopian Books Like Hunger Games: My Ultimate List
The Best John Grisham Books: Must-Reads For Legal Thriller Fans
The Best James Patterson Books Of All Time


1984 by George Orwell

1984 is a dystopian novel written by George Orwell, published in 1949. It explores themes of surveillance, government control, and the loss of individual freedom. The story is set in a totalitarian society ruled by the Party, led by Big Brother. The protagonist, Winston Smith, works for the Ministry of Truth and becomes disillusioned with the oppressive regime.

The novel delves into the dangers of totalitarianism and the manipulation of truth. It depicts a society where every action and thought is monitored by the government, and even private relationships are controlled. 1984 serves as a warning about the dangers of authoritarianism and the importance of preserving individual rights and freedoms.

The themes and ideas explored in 1984 make it a compelling read for fans of The Giver. Both books examine oppressive societies and the consequences of conformity. They raise questions about the value of individuality and the importance of challenging authority. If you enjoyed the thought-provoking and dystopian elements of The Giver, 1984 is a must-read.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury is a dystopian novel that shares similar themes and ideas with The Giver. Set in a future society where books are banned and burned, Fahrenheit 451 explores the importance of knowledge, individuality, and the dangers of censorship.

The protagonist, Guy Montag, is a fireman who is tasked with burning books. However, as he begins to question his role in society, he starts to rebel against the oppressive government and becomes determined to preserve literature and free thought.

In Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury paints a stark and unsettling picture of a world where intellectualism is suppressed and conformity is enforced. The novel raises important questions about the power of ideas, the dangers of mass media, and the value of critical thinking.

Readers who enjoyed The Giver and its exploration of a controlled and restricted society will appreciate Fahrenheit 451’s thought-provoking and cautionary tale. Bradbury’s vivid imagery and intricate storytelling make this novel a must-read for fans of dystopian fiction.

The Maze Runner by James Dashner

The Maze Runner is a thrilling dystopian novel that follows the story of Thomas, a teenage boy who wakes up in a mysterious maze with no memory of his past. As he and his fellow Gladers try to navigate the deadly maze and uncover the secrets of their existence, they face dangerous creatures and uncover shocking truths about their world.

Similar to The Giver, The Maze Runner explores themes of control, sacrifice, and the search for truth in a dystopian society. Both books feature protagonists who question the rules and limitations imposed upon them and strive to uncover the hidden truths behind their seemingly perfect worlds.

Although The Maze Runner is more action-packed and suspenseful compared to The Giver, both books ultimately ask important questions about society, humanity, and the power of individual choice. Fans of The Giver will appreciate the fast-paced plot and intense world-building in The Maze Runner, making it a great recommendation for readers who enjoyed the thought-provoking nature of Lois Lowry’s classic novel.

Divergent by Veronica Roth

Divergent by Veronica Roth is a dystopian novel set in a future society where people are divided into factions based on their personalities. The story follows Tris, a young girl who discovers she is “Divergent,” meaning she doesn’t fit neatly into any one faction. As Tris navigates the dangerous world of her society, she must uncover the truth about her identity and fight against the oppressive regime.

Divergent shares many thematic elements with The Giver, such as a dystopian setting, a protagonist questioning the strict rules of their society, and a focus on individuality and personal freedom. Both books explore the dangers of conformity and the importance of challenging oppressive systems.

While The Giver focuses more on the psychological aspects of a dystopian society, Divergent delves into action-packed adventures and explores themes of identity, loyalty, and the power of choice. If you enjoyed the thought-provoking nature of The Giver and are looking for a fast-paced dystopian read, Divergent is a great choice.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins is a dystopian novel set in a post-apocalyptic society where young people are forced to participate in a deadly televised competition. This gripping and thought-provoking book explores themes of government control, rebellion, and the power of individual agency.

Similar to The Giver, The Hunger Games presents a world where the government tightly controls its citizens and their access to information and resources. Both books also feature young protagonists who question the status quo and challenge the oppressive systems they live in.

The Hunger Games is known for its fast-paced action, thrilling plot twists, and strong female lead. It delves into the themes of survival, sacrifice, and the consequences of power. If you enjoyed the suspense and social commentary in The Giver, The Hunger Games is a must-read.

In addition, The Hunger Games has been turned into a successful film franchise, which further immerses viewers in the dystopian world created by Suzanne Collins. The movies capture the intensity and emotional impact of the story, making it a great choice for fans of The Giver who enjoy visual adaptations.

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld is a dystopian young adult novel that shares similar themes with The Giver. Set in a future society where everyone undergoes extreme cosmetic surgery at the age of 16 to become “Pretty,” the book explores themes of conformity, individuality, and the cost of perfection.

The protagonist, Tally Youngblood, initially looks forward to her transformation and eagerly awaits her 16th birthday. However, she soon discovers the dark side of the transformation and the sacrifices that come with it. Through her journey, Tally questions the societal norms and fights against the oppressive regime.

Like The Giver, Uglies raises questions about the price of sameness and challenges the importance of individuality and personal choices. It also tackles themes of identity, freedom, and the role of government in controlling its citizens.

Uglies is the first book in a series, followed by Pretties, Specials, and Extras, which further delve into the dystopian world and Tally’s fight for freedom. If you enjoyed The Giver and its exploration of a futuristic society, Uglies offers a thrilling and thought-provoking read.

The Selection by Kiera Cass

The Selection is a young adult dystopian novel by Kiera Cass. It is set in a future society where a caste system determines one’s place in society and the protagonist, America Singer, is selected to participate in a competition to win the heart of Prince Maxon and become the future queen.

The Selection shares similarities with The Giver in terms of its dystopian setting and exploration of societal control. Both novels delve into themes of conformity, individuality, and the struggle for personal freedom. The Selection also explores the complexities of love and the pressures of societal expectations.

If you enjoyed The Giver and are looking for similar books, The Selection is a great choice. It combines elements of romance, dystopia, and social commentary to create an engaging and thought-provoking story.

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

Ender’s Game, written by Orson Scott Card, is a science fiction novel that shares similarities with The Giver in terms of its dystopian setting and exploration of moral and ethical themes. The story follows Ender Wiggin, a gifted child who is chosen to train at a military academy in order to prepare for an alien invasion.

In Ender’s Game, like The Giver, the protagonist is burdened with immense responsibility at a young age and must navigate complex ethical dilemmas. Both books explore the themes of individuality, conformity, and the consequences of a society that values order and control above all else.

Ender’s Game delves into the psychological effects of war and examines the nature of authority and power. It raises questions about the sacrifices that individuals are willing to make for the greater good and the blurred lines between heroism and manipulation.

Overall, if you enjoyed The Giver, Ender’s Game is a thought-provoking and thrilling read that will captivate you with its exploration of similar themes and its gripping narrative.

Matched by Ally Condie

Matched, written by Ally Condie, is a young adult dystopian novel that takes place in a society where all aspects of life are controlled by the government. The story follows Cassia Reyes, a young woman who is matched with her ideal partner by the government’s algorithms. However, when a glitch reveals the possibility of a different life, Cassia begins to question the strict rules and limitations set by society.

Like The Giver, Matched explores themes of conformity, individuality, and the importance of making choices. Both books present dystopian societies that initially seem perfect and structured for the greater good, but ultimately reveal dark secrets and hidden agendas. Throughout the story, Cassia struggles with her desire for freedom and autonomy, leading her to challenge the oppressive system and fight for a better future.

Matched is a captivating and thought-provoking read that delves into the complexities of love, identity, and personal freedom. The gripping narrative and well-developed characters make it a compelling choice for fans of The Giver and readers interested in dystopian fiction.

The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau

The City of Ember is a captivating dystopian novel that shares similarities with The Giver in terms of its exploration of a controlled society and the journey of its young protagonists. Written by Jeanne DuPrau, this book takes readers on a thrilling adventure set in an underground city.

The story follows Lina and Doon, two twelve-year-olds who discover a hidden message that reveals the truth about their decaying city. As Lina and Doon try to find a way to escape and bring hope to their community, they uncover secrets and face challenges that test their courage and determination.

Similar to The Giver, The City of Ember raises thought-provoking questions about authority, conformity, and the importance of knowledge and individuality. Both books explore themes of oppression and the power of young people to challenge and change their society for the better.

The City of Ember is the first book in a series, followed by The People of Sparks, The Prophet of Yonwood, and The Diamond of Darkhold. Readers who enjoyed The Giver will likely be captivated by the immersive world-building and suspenseful storytelling found in The City of Ember.

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes is a captivating historical fiction novel that explores themes of friendship, female empowerment, and the love of books. Set in Depression-era America, the story follows a group of women who become part of the Pack Horse Library Project, delivering books to remote areas of Kentucky.

The novel delves into the power of literature to bring people together and ignite change. It highlights the courage and resilience of these women as they navigate challenges, prejudice, and the constraints of their time. Moyes skillfully weaves together the personal stories of the characters, creating a rich and immersive reading experience.

The Giver of Stars is a heartfelt and inspiring tale that will appeal to fans of The Giver for its exploration of societal issues and the transformative power of knowledge. It beautifully captures the spirit of community, the importance of literacy, and the impact that books can have on individuals and their communities.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale is a dystopian novel by Margaret Atwood that explores a future society called Gilead, where women are oppressed and stripped of their rights. The story follows Offred, a handmaid assigned to bear children for high-ranking officials, as she navigates the strict rules and dangers of this totalitarian regime.

Like The Giver, The Handmaid’s Tale delves into themes of oppression, control, and the fight for freedom. Both books raise questions about societal norms, individuality, and the power of memory and knowledge.

Atwood’s writing is captivating and thought-provoking, making The Handmaid’s Tale a must-read for fans of dystopian literature. The novel’s exploration of gender roles, reproductive rights, and the consequences of silence resonates with readers and continues to be relevant in today’s society.

For those looking for similar reads, other dystopian novels like 1984 by George Orwell and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley also tackle themes of control and conformity. These books provide another perspective on dystopian societies and the struggles faced by individuals within them.

If you enjoyed the thought-provoking nature of The Giver, The Maze Runner by James Dashner and Divergent by Veronica Roth offer thrilling adventures with complex moral dilemmas. These books explore themes of identity, sacrifice, and the fight against oppressive systems.

For readers who enjoyed the exploration of societal norms and the struggle against authority in The Giver, The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins and Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card provide action-packed stories that challenge the status quo and highlight the power of individual courage.

Other books like The Giver that focus on themes of identity and challenging societal expectations include Uglies by Scott Westerfeld, Matched by Ally Condie, and The Selection by Kiera Cass. These novels delve into the consequences of conformity and the importance of personal choice.

The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau offers a unique dystopian setting where the residents live underground and must navigate a dark and decaying society. This book, like The Giver, explores themes of discovery, resilience, and the power of knowledge.

Lastly, for readers who are looking for a different genre but still appreciate a captivating story, The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes is a historical fiction novel that explores the power of books and the importance of literacy. Although it is set in a different time period, this book speaks to the transformative nature of literature and its impact on individuals and communities.

These books, like The Giver, offer engaging stories and thought-provoking themes that will captivate readers and leave them pondering the intricacies of society and the human experience.

Conclusion

If you loved reading “The Giver” and are looking for similar books that will capture your imagination, there are plenty of options to choose from. “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley, “1984” by George Orwell, and “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury are all classic dystopian novels that explore themes of control and individuality.

If you’re more interested in young adult fiction, “The Maze Runner” by James Dashner, “Divergent” by Veronica Roth, and “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins offer thrilling adventures in dystopian worlds. Other options include “Uglies” by Scott Westerfeld, “The Selection” by Kiera Cass, and “Ender’s Game” by Orson Scott Card.

Whether you prefer classic dystopian literature or action-packed young adult novels, these recommendations are sure to satisfy your appetite for thought-provoking and engaging stories. Happy reading!