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13 Great Books Like The Outsiders: Discover Similar Stories

If you’re a fan of the classic coming-of-age novel, The Outsiders, then you know just how impactful and captivating the story can be. The characters, the themes, and the emotions all combine to create a truly unforgettable reading experience. But what do you do when you’ve finished the book and you’re craving more stories that will evoke those same feelings? I got you!

Books Like The Outsiders by S. E. Hington
The Outsiders by S. E. Hington

Books Like The Outsiders by S. E. Hilton

Here’s a quick run through of the books like The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

  • The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Rumble Fish by S.E. Hinton
  • Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
  • A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • The Giver by Lois Lowry
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • Looking for Alaska by John Green
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

In this article, we’ve compiled a list of 13 books like The Outsiders that will take you on similar journeys of self-discovery, friendship, and resilience. From the timeless To Kill a Mockingbird to the heartwrenching The Fault in Our Stars, each of these books will leave a lasting impact and keep you turning the pages late into the night.

01. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye is a classic coming-of-age novel written by J.D. Salinger. It tells the story of Holden Caulfield, a rebellious teenager struggling with the hypocrisy and phoniness of the adult world. The book explores themes of identity, innocence, and alienation.

Like The Outsiders, The Catcher in the Rye is often studied in schools and is beloved by many readers, especially young adults. It captures the angst and confusion of adolescence and explores the universal themes of growing up and finding one’s place in the world.

If you enjoyed The Outsiders, you may also enjoy The Catcher in the Rye for its honest portrayal of teenage life and its exploration of deeper existential questions.

02. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird is a classic novel written by Harper Lee and published in 1960. It tells the story of Scout Finch, a young girl growing up in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. The novel explores themes of race, class, and morality through the eyes of Scout as she navigates her way through a small Southern town.

One of the reasons why To Kill a Mockingbird is often compared to The Outsiders is its powerful portrayal of social injustice and the impact it has on individuals and communities. Both novels shed light on the harsh realities of prejudice and discrimination and the courage it takes to fight against them.

Another similarity between the two books is the coming-of-age element. Both novels focus on young protagonists who are forced to confront difficult truths about the world around them. They grapple with issues of identity, morality, and the complexities of human nature.

To Kill a Mockingbird has been praised for its compelling characters and evocative storytelling. It is a timeless tale that continues to resonate with readers of all ages.

Books Like The Outsiders
A quote from the book The Outsiders by S. E. Hington. From Kindle.

03. Rumble Fish by S.E. Hinton

Rumble Fish is a novel by S.E. Hinton that explores themes of rebellion, identity, and the conflicts of adolescence. Similar to The Outsiders, Rumble Fish takes place in a gritty and turbulent setting. The story follows Rusty-James, a teenage gang member who idolizes his older brother, Motorcycle Boy.

The novel delves into the complexities of brotherhood and the desire for individuality. It explores the impact of societal pressures, as Rusty-James faces the expectations set by his brother and the gang culture they are a part of. Through vivid and visceral storytelling, Rumble Fish examines the struggle for self-discovery in the midst of a harsh and unforgiving environment.

Like The Outsiders, Rumble Fish presents readers with flawed and compelling characters who navigate the challenges of coming of age. It delves into themes of loyalty, rebellion, and the search for identity, making it a great read for fans of The Outsiders.

04. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

“Speak” is a powerful young adult novel written by Laurie Halse Anderson. It tells the story of Melinda Sordino, a high school freshman who becomes an outcast after calling the police to break up a party. The book explores themes of trauma, silence, and finding one’s voice.

Melinda’s experiences at school are depicted with raw honesty as she battles with her own feelings of guilt, depression, and isolation. The author skillfully captures the emotions and struggles of a teenage girl who is dealing with trauma and explores the complexities of coming of age.

“Speak” is a thought-provoking and moving novel that addresses important topics such as bullying, mental health, and the power of self-expression. It is a must-read for anyone who enjoys realistic fiction and wants to delve into the inner world of a teenager facing challenging circumstances.

05. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier

The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier is a classic coming-of-age novel that explores themes of rebellion, conformity, and the abuse of power. The story is set at a Catholic boys’ school and follows a student named Jerry Renault as he refuses to participate in the annual chocolate sale, which serves as a metaphor for the corrupt and manipulative nature of authority.

The Chocolate War delves into the struggles and pressures faced by teenagers in a hierarchical environment. It explores the themes of individuality and nonconformity, as Jerry stands up against the school’s secret society and its oppressive practices. The novel raises questions about the price of standing up for what one believes in and the consequences of challenging authority.

If you enjoyed The Outsiders and are looking for similar stories that delve into the complexities of teenage rebellion and societal expectations, The Chocolate War is a must-read. It offers a thought-provoking exploration of power dynamics and the courage it takes to defy the status quo.

06. A Separate Peace by John Knowles

A Separate Peace is a timeless coming-of-age novel written by John Knowles. Set during World War II at a boys’ boarding school in New Hampshire, the book explores themes of friendship, rivalry, and the loss of innocence.

The story follows the protagonist, Gene Forrester, and his close friend, Phineas, as they navigate the complexities of adolescence and the looming war. Their relationship is tested by jealousy and competition, leading to a tragic event that changes their lives forever.

With its poignant exploration of themes and relatable characters, A Separate Peace is a must-read for fans of The Outsiders. It delves into similar themes of friendship, identity, and the challenges of growing up in a turbulent world.

If you enjoyed The Outsiders, A Separate Peace offers a compelling and thought-provoking read that will leave you reflecting on the complexities of human relationships and the impact of external forces on our lives.

Another quote from the book The Outsiders by S. E. Hington. From Kindle.

07. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

The Perks of Being a Wallflower, written by Stephen Chbosky, is a coming-of-age novel that explores themes of identity, friendship, and mental health. The story follows Charlie, an introverted high school freshman who navigates his way through the ups and downs of adolescence with the help of a group of older friends.

Like The Outsiders, The Perks of Being a Wallflower delves into the experiences of young people as they navigate the challenges of growing up. Both books tackle themes of belonging, self-discovery, and the complexities of teenage life.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a compelling and thought-provoking novel that explores the universal struggles of teenagehood. It is a must-read for fans of The Outsiders who are looking for similar stories that capture the essence of youth and the search for identity.

08. The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Giver is a dystopian novel written by Lois Lowry and is often considered a classic in young adult literature. The story follows Jonas, a young boy living in a seemingly perfect society where everything is controlled and chosen for its citizens. However, as Jonas begins to uncover the dark secrets of his society, he realizes that conformity and sameness come at a great cost.

In The Giver, like in The Outsiders, the young protagonist questions the rules and norms of the society they inhabit and seeks to find their own identity and purpose. The themes of individuality, freedom, and the power of memory are explored in both novels.

The Giver offers a thought-provoking look at the consequences of sacrificing individual freedom for the sake of a utopian society. It raises important questions about the value of choice, diversity, and human emotions. Like The Outsiders, The Giver is a coming-of-age story that challenges readers to think critically about the world around them and the importance of embracing their own unique voice.

If you enjoyed The Outsiders, The Giver is definitely a book worth exploring. Its thought-provoking themes and well-crafted storytelling make it a compelling read for both young adults and adults alike.

09. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

The Hate U Give is a powerful contemporary novel written by Angie Thomas. It follows the story of Starr Carter, a sixteen-year-old girl who witnesses the fatal shooting of her unarmed friend Khalil by a police officer. The book explores themes of racial injustice, police brutality, and the importance of speaking out against systemic oppression.

Similar to The Outsiders, The Hate U Give tackles important social issues and delves into the complexities of navigating identity and finding one’s voice. It addresses the realities of living in a racially divided society and the impact of violence on individuals and communities.

The Hate U Give has received critical acclaim for its thought-provoking narrative and authentic portrayal of contemporary issues. It is a compelling read that encourages readers to confront and challenge social injustices. If you enjoyed The Outsiders, you will likely find The Hate U Give to be a compelling and relevant read.

10. The Fault in Our Stars John Green

The Fault in Our Stars is a heartwrenching young adult novel written by John Green. The story follows Hazel Grace Lancaster, a sixteen-year-old girl with terminal cancer, as she falls in love with Augustus Waters, a fellow cancer survivor. Together, they navigate the challenges of illness, love, and mortality.

Like The Outsiders, The Fault in Our Stars explores themes of friendship, loyalty, and the search for identity. Both books offer a raw and honest portrayal of teenage emotions and the complexities of navigating the world as a young person.

Readers who enjoyed The Outsiders will find themselves captivated by the emotionally charged storytelling of The Fault in Our Stars. The novel beautifully captures the highs and lows of life, reminding us of the power of human connection and the resilience of the human spirit.

11. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief, written by Markus Zusak, is a poignant and powerful novel set during World War II. It tells the story of Liesel Meminger, a young girl living in Nazi Germany who finds solace and escape in books.

The Book Thief explores themes of love, loss, and the power of words. It highlights the importance of literature and storytelling as a means of preserving humanity and resisting oppression. The novel is narrated by Death, which adds a unique and haunting perspective to the narrative.

If you enjoyed The Outsiders, you may find The Book Thief to be a compelling read. Both novels address themes of identity, belonging, and the struggle to find one’s place in the world. They also explore the impact of societal forces on individuals and the power of human connection in the face of adversity.

12. Looking for Alaska by John Green

Looking for Alaska is a young adult novel written by John Green. It follows the story of Miles Halter, who leaves his hometown to attend a boarding school in Alabama. There, he meets and becomes infatuated with the enigmatic Alaska Young, who leads him on a journey of self-discovery.

The novel explores themes of teenage angst, the search for identity, and the complexities of relationships. It delves into deep philosophical questions and tackles the issues of loss, grief, and the meaning of life.

Looking for Alaska is a coming-of-age story that resonates with readers of all ages. It explores the universal struggles and emotions that teenagers face while offering thought-provoking insights and poignant moments. It is a must-read for fans of The Outsiders and anyone looking for a captivating and thought-provoking read.

13. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian is a coming-of-age novel by Sherman Alexie that tells the story of Arnold Spirit Jr., a young Native American boy living on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington. Arnold is determined to break free from the limitations of his community and pursue his dreams.

The novel explores themes of identity, friendship, family, and the struggles that Indigenous communities face in contemporary society. It delves into issues of race, poverty, and discrimination, while also highlighting the power of education and resilience.

Similar to The Outsiders, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian addresses the challenges and conflicts that young people face as they navigate their way through adolescence. It offers a unique perspective on Native American culture and sheds light on the experiences of marginalized communities.

With its honest and introspective narrative, the novel provides a thought-provoking and heartfelt exploration of identity and the search for belonging. It is a powerful and poignant story that will resonate with readers of all ages.

Books Like The Outsiders – Final Thoughts

If you enjoyed reading The Outsiders and are looking for similar stories that explore themes of adolescence, coming-of-age, and societal issues, then you’re in luck! The books listed above, like The Catcher in the Rye, To Kill a Mockingbird, and Rumble Fish, offer compelling and thought-provoking narratives that will keep you engaged and emotionally invested.

Whether you’re drawn to realistic fiction, dystopian worlds, or novels that tackle tough topics, there’s something for everyone on this list. So go ahead, dive into another captivating read and continue your literary journey!

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